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9/11

Ghost Lakes - Lake Cumberland

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Found on Facebook Each of these towns represents a different element of America’s development. Yet they all share the same fate: they, and hundreds of other communities like them, were vacated, demolished and flooded to make way for dams and reservoirs. Their remnants persist, preserved underwater, and sometimes emerge, as reminders of what was not allowed to be. Over 50 years ago, the Army Corp of Engineers built Wolf Creek Dam on the Cumberland River and began the creation of Lake Cumberland. Located in Clinton, Laurel, McCreary, Pulaski, Russell and Wayne counties in south-central Kentucky, Lake Cumberland shoreline measures 1,255 miles and is spread over 65,330 acres. The main lake is 101 miles long and over 1 mile across at its widest point. Originally planned from the 1920s and enacted by Congress in the 1930s, with groundbreaking in 1941, early construction of Wolf Creek Dam to impound the Cumberland River was halted by World War II. Following the war, work resumed and the dam was closed in 1950, beginning what was originally named Wolf Creek Reservoir. The name “Wolf Creek” comes from the original planned location for the dam, several miles upstream near the confluence of Wolf Creek with the Cumberland River. Though the location changed, the name remained. The body of water was officially renamed “Lake Cumberland” in 1954. Wolf Creek Dam is the 22nd largest dam in the United States. The primary reasons for the dam was for flood control of the occasionally wild Cumberland River, and for hydroelectric power generation. Once the purchase price was agreed upon, properties were numbered with the owner\'s tract number. Owners received a \"Notice of Acceptance of Option for Purchase of Land\" letter with a full copy of the accepted options from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Most people tried to remain on their properties as long as possible. Pictured is the numbered farm of Shell and Gladys Oatts, which was moved to Hwy. 1275 before the property was flooded. It wasn’t only farmland that was flooded—sometimes whole towns were lost to the lake. Communities such as Rowena, Horseshoe Bottom (currently under Jamestown Marina), Swan Pond Bottom, Lulu, Long Bottom, Indian Creek and Stokes would cease to exist once the lake filled. Residents in Long Bottom were the first to leave their homes, churches and schools. Shortly after, other communities were evacuated. 123 cemeteries and the remains of 2,800 people also were relocated because of the impoundment for Lake Cumberland. Headstones, coffin lids and remains were removed and reinterred in cemeteries on higher ground. With the lowering of Lake Cumberland in 2007, several small cemeteries resurfaced, exposing empty coffins and burial vaults. For more information, try to find a copy of Carol L. Sanders book, The Cemeteries Under Lake Cumberland and Russell County, Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1858, 1874, 1878, 1903-04. Burnside was more fortunate. Before the dam was completed in the spring of 1951, entire structures in the town were moved to higher ground. Houses were built and businesses relocated. Many of the businesses refused to relocate to \"Upper\" Burnside. Jobs were lost and some residents, mostly the young, moved on to bigger towns and new jobs. The following pictures show what the area of Burnside looked like during the flooding. A bridge span was submerged when the lake filled up faster than expected. In 2007, fearing a break in the dam, the lake was lowered to a level of 680 feet. Repairs to the dam were completed in 2013. Thanks to Jim Patton for bringing this ghost lake to my attention! Click the link to see several old pictures. http://ghostlakes.blogspot.com/2013/12/wolf-creek-dam-ky.html

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I have several old pictures of my family at their place on Pumpkin Creek in the 1920\'s, 30\'s and 40\'s before it was flooded. Will try to get one of the forum guru\'s to post a few here. :)

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Thanks 911 In the 80s I used to stop in the old general store on Route 27 just south of the entrance to the State Park. This store housed the old Rowena Post office that had to be moved from the flooded town of Rowena. I talked many times to an older lady who still was bitter that the town had been flooded.. In the back of the store was an old fashioned soda pop cooler. On many hot summer days after fishing on the river....I visited with my kids to drink an ice cold bottle of Coca Cola.:P Sadly this general store burned to the ground sometime in the 80s.

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this is neat, but I think what they show as lake flooding in the photos is actual normal flooding as I was under the understanding the only real thing left in Burnside to be torn down or moved during lake flooding was the bridge and it was later floated off. I think the lower levels support that as I saw no signs of buildings other than foundations and the old 27 roadbed.

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[rquote=451469&tid=38144&author=9/11]I have several old pictures of my family at their place on Pumpkin Creek in the 1920\'s, 30\'s and 40\'s before it was flooded. Will try to get one of the forum guru\'s to post a few here. :)[/rquote] I might could tomorrow

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Thanks 911 In the 80s I used to stop in the old general store on Route 127 just south of the entrance to the State Park. This store housed the old Rowena Post office that had to be moved from the flooded town of Rowena. I talked many times to an older lady who still was bitter that the town had been flooded... She told me many stories about the little town of Rowena now covered by water. In the back of the store was an old fashioned soda pop cooler. On many hot summer days after fishing on the river....I visited with my kids to drink an ice cold bottle of Coca Cola.:P Sadly this general store burned to the ground sometime in the 80s.

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[rquote=451485&tid=38144&author=E_H][rquote=451469&tid=38144&author=9/11]I have several old pictures of my family at their place on Pumpkin Creek in the 1920\'s, 30\'s and 40\'s before it was flooded. Will try to get one of the forum guru\'s to post a few here. :)[/rquote] I might could tomorrow[/rquote] Thanks E_H I would appreciate that. I also have a few more that I\'ll scan a little later and add to what you\'ve already seen. :)

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[rquote=451484&tid=38144&author=E_H]this is neat, but I think what they show as lake flooding in the photos is actual normal flooding as I was under the understanding the only real thing left in Burnside to be torn down or moved during lake flooding was the bridge and it was later floated off. I think the lower levels support that as I saw no signs of buildings other than foundations and the old 27 roadbed.[/rquote] Also think you may be right about this. Not that familiar with the history up there but was thinking the same as you when I saw those pictures.

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[rquote=451488&tid=38144&author=9/11][rquote=451484&tid=38144&author=E_H]this is neat, but I think what they show as lake flooding in the photos is actual normal flooding as I was under the understanding the only real thing left in Burnside to be torn down or moved during lake flooding was the bridge and it was later floated off. I think the lower levels support that as I saw no signs of buildings other than foundations and the old 27 roadbed.[/rquote] Also think you may be right about this. Not that familiar with the history up there but was thinking the same as you when I saw those pictures.[/rquote] Agreed, I think cumberline posted the same pictures on here before and those were taken during a flood. I will try to do a search when I\'m on a real computer with a real keyboard.

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Surely there is a forum member or two from that end that would know if the lake was filled up with the buildings still standing or not. I\'d be willing to bet they were torn or burned down before the lake was filled, but maybe not. Just seems like there would have been a lot of scuba diving opportunities up there over the years and thus a lot of talk about underwater structures if they had been left standing.

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I have seen the foundations but have never seen part of a building. In the Story of Lake Cumberland video it shows and scene from Burnside Island before the fill and no buildings are shown. The bridge that had to be floated out is seen but no buildings.

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[rquote=451486&tid=38144&author=Bluebird]Thanks 911 In the 80s I used to stop in the old general store on Route 27 just south of the entrance to the State Park. This store housed the old Rowena Post office that had to be moved from the flooded town of Rowena. I talked many times to an older lady who still was bitter that the town had been flooded... She told me many stories about the little town of Rowena now covered by water. In the back of the store was an old fashioned soda pop cooler. On many hot summer days after fishing on the river....I visited with my kids to drink an ice cold bottle of Coca Cola.:P Sadly this general store burned to the ground sometime in the 80s.[/rquote]That would be 127...27 is in somerset ;)

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9/11\'s photos Wright family at Pumpkin Creek home around 1925. This house stood on the banks of Pumpkin Creek at the entrance to the state park launch ramp cove. [file]25909[/file] Logging along Pumpkin Creek. L to R Grant Wright (my grandfather) and unknown individual nicknamed \"Bigun\". Probably taken in the late 30\'s or early 40\'s. Possibly taken at the fork of Pumpkin near the head of the creek. [file]25911[/file] Grandpa logging on Pumpkin Creek with his team of mules. Photo taken at the same time and location as the other one. (Notice the small trees in the background of both pictures are the same.) [file]25913[/file] Early boating on Lake Cumberland. Jessie Wright driving with Hollis Williams standing. Possibly taken at the Old Rowena Landing on north side of lake. Early 1950\'s. [file]25915[/file] Members of Wright family at old Jamestown Dock in the early to mid 50\'s. [file]25917[/file] Members of the Wright family at the original Jamestown Dock early to mid 50\'s. Clearings in trees on hill in background is where the office and cabins are located. Edge of launching ramp visible on right. [file]25919[/file] At old Rowena on north side of Lake Cumberland early to mid 50\'s. [file]25921[/file] Wolf Creek Dam early 1950\'s. Don\'t know the story, but there appears to be a large sign sitting in the middle of the road where the people are gathered. Wondering if this might have been before the road officially opened. Notice no guardrails on either side of the road. [file]25923[/file]

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Burnside JR

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Please notice utility poles in most of the pictures! I\'m pretty sure the COE would have removed those before impoundment. I believe the pictures were taken during the 1937 flood.

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Wish we had pics of more vehicles to narrow time frame...

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This thread is great. Love the old pictures. I wonder how many people visit jamestown marina in dresses and pants? Pops maybe?

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Thanks to E_H for posting the pictures for me. Can anyone identify the year model of any of the vehicles in the picture at the end of the dam? I don\'t know the story on the picture, but am thinking it may have been taken just prior to the road across the dam officially opening. Knowing the year model of the vehicles in the picture could prove that theory wrong. Will try to find out what year the road officially open to traffic.

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All early 50\'s cars/trucks in the photo. The Ford truck in the front appears to be a 51, the car behind it is a 50 and the Chevrolet truck is a 47-52, 53\'s were noticeably different.

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Thanks Lock, now if I can find out what year the road opened to traffic. :)

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Trying to repost some of these old pics at basscat85's request since they didn't make the trip over when the forum software changed.

 

Wright family and friends/neighbors at Grandpa's old place on Pumpkin Creek. The old house stood on the banks of Pumpkin at the confluence of "Wright Hollow" (the cove the LC State Park launch ramp is located in). this picture would've been taken sometime in mid to later 20's based on apparent age of some of the younger kids.

 

Click to enlarge

post-715-0-65376000-1411007899_thumb.jpg

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Grandpa Wright and some local fellow nicknamed "Bigun" logging with his mules in Pumpkin Creek. Guessing this was late 40's before they had to move out. Looks like it was taken just before Pumpkin Creek forks up near the head waters.

post-715-0-69210800-1411009078_thumb.jpg

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